These photos show Egypt from the 1870s

 
 

Egypt has one of the longest histories of any modern country, arising in the tenth millennium BC as one of the world’s first nation states.Considered a cradle of civilisation, Ancient Egypt experienced some of the earliest developments of writing, agriculture, urbanisation, organised religion and central government. Iconic monuments such as the Giza Necropolis and its Great Sphinx, as well the ruins of Memphis, Thebes, Karnak, and the Valley of the Kings, reflect this legacy and remain a significant focus of archaeological study and popular interest worldwide. Egypt’s rich cultural heritage is an integral part of its national identity, having endured, and at times assimilated, various foreign influences, including Greek, Persian, Roman, Arab, Ottoman, and European. Although Christianised in the first century of the Common Era, it was subsequently Islamised due to the Islamic conquests of the seventh century.

We can enjoy these beautiful sights of ancient Egypt thanks to New York Public Library  that has shared an incredible gallery of over 9,000 photos and illustrations of the Middle East from the 17th century to the beginning of the 20th century.

Monuments of ancient Egypt and the biblical world figured prominently in the early years of photography.

All photos New York Public Library

Alexandria

Alexandria

 

Cairo passage of Kasr-en-Nil [Qasr al-Nil]

Cairo passage of Kasr-en-Nil [Qasr al-Nil]

 

 

Cairo passage of Kasr-en-Nil [Qasr al-Nil]

Cairo passage of Kasr-en-Nil [Qasr al-Nil]

Camels in the Desert

Camels in the Desert

 

Climbing a Pyramid

Climbing a Pyramid

 

Garden of Ezbekieh [Azbakia]

Garden of Ezbekieh [Azbakia]

Giza Pyramids and Tombs of Bedouins

Giza Pyramids and Tombs of Bedouins

Human settlement in Egypt dates back to at least 40,000 BC with Aterian tool manufacturing. Ancient Egyptian civilization coalesced around 3150 BC with the political unification of Upper and Lower Egypt under the first pharaoh of the First Dynasty, Narmer. Predominately native Egyptian rule lasted until the conquering of Egypt by the Achaemenid Persian Empire in the 6th century BC.

In 332 BC, Macedonian ruler Alexander the Great conquered Egypt as he toppled the Achaemenids and established the Hellenistic Ptolemaic Kingdom, whose first ruler was one of Alexander’s former generals, Ptolemy I Soter. The Ptolemies had to fight native rebellions and were involved in foreign and civil wars that led to the decline of the kingdom and its final annexation by Rome. The death of Cleopatra ended the nominal independence of Egypt resulting in Egypt becoming one of the provinces of the Roman Empire.

 

Kafr Near the Pyramids

Kafr Near the Pyramids

 

Karnak Temple of Thothmes III [Tuthmosis III], the Statues of Amenhotep I

Karnak Temple of Thothmes III [Tuthmosis III], the Statues of Amenhotep I

Mokattam, Giyuschi Mosque [al-Juyushi]

Mokattam, Giyuschi Mosque [al-Juyushi]

Mosque el Azhar (the students)

Mosque el Azhar (the students)

 

Phylae the Booth

Phylae the Booth

 

Ramesseum, statues of Osiris

Ramesseum, statues of Osiris

 

Route to Giza

Route to Giza

 

Route to the Giza Pyramids

Route to the Giza Pyramids

Roman rule in Egypt (including Byzantine) lasted from 30 BC to 641 AD, with a brief Sassanid Persian interlude between 619-629, known as Sasanian Egypt. After the Islamic conquest of Egypt, parts of Egypt became provinces of successive Caliphates and other Muslim dynasties: Rashidun Caliphate (632-661), Umayyad Caliphate (661–750), Abbasid Caliphate (750-909), Fatimid Caliphate (909-1171), Ayyubid Sultanate (1171–1260), and the Mamluk Sultanate of Egypt (1250-1517). In 1517, Ottoman sultan Selim I captured Cairo, absorbing Egypt into the Ottoman Empire.